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DIRECT SEEDING INTO MULCH SYSTEM AND CLIMATE CHANGE, A CASE STUDY IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE

Congress: 2008
Author(s): Reza Khaledian


Keyword(s): climate change, direct seeding, irrigation demand
AbstractDIRECT SEEDING INTO MULCH SYSTEM AND CLIMATE CHANGE, A CASE STUDY IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE M.R. Khaledian1,2, J.C. Mailhol1, P. Ruelle1, J.M. Gonzalez-Camacho1,3, D. Rollin1 1) UMR G-EAU Cemagref-Cirad-Engref-IRD, BP 5095, 34196 Montpellier Cedex 05 France 2) Guilan University of Iran; email:mohammad.khaledian@cemagref.fr 3) Colegio de Postgraduados, Montecillo, Mexique In response to the negative impact of soil degradation under conventional cropping systems with tillage, direct seeding into mulch without tillage and with a cover crop is being developed. Apart from the positive effects on the soil conservation, sustained land production and dropped labour costs, another major impact of direct seeding into mulch is CO2 mitigation due to better carbon sequestration. The aim of the research reported here was to assess local impacts of increasing of CO2 rate on irrigation demand and water efficiency at the Lavalette experimental station. There are two tillage treatments in this study i.e. direct seeding into mulch and conventional tillage. A field experiment was established at Lavalette experimental station (43 40 N, 3 50 E, altitude 30 m) in Montpellier in the South of France. There is a weather station at the experimental station. Climate variable were introduced into the stochastic weather generator, LARS-WC, to simulate local daily climate scenarios for present CO2 level and future CO2 level (increased CO2 level). The STICS crop model was used after calibration and validation at Lavalette to simulate the direct and indirect effects of increasing atmospheric CO2 on irrigation demand and crop production. Several simulation conditions were studied for current climate and future climate scenarios. Principal results show that global warming increases irrigation demand and reduces the production.
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