IWRA Webinars

Webinar: World Water Day - 22 March 2017 - Wastewater

Organizer: International Water Resources Association

Date and Time:
March 22: 15:00 (Central European), 14:00 (GMT), 23:00 (Tokyo), 9:00 (New York)

Moderator: Scott McKenzie, PhD Candidate, University of British Columbia (Canada)

Panel: Pritha Hariram (Manager, Water Supply & Sanitation Services, International Water Association) John Payne (Consultant, United Nations Industrial Development Organization, World Water Development Report), Gabriel Eckstein (Professor, Law Department, Texas A&M University), Matthijs Wessels (Junior Member, Scientific Programme Committee, World Water Week 2017), Hannah Leckie (Policy Analyst, Water Team, OECD).

Welcome to World Water Day 2017 - Wastewater. This webinar addresses this fascinating topic by bringing together IWRA and its members, leading academics, and policy specialists to discuss this year's fundamental theme. Main topics of this webinar include:

●     Launch of the 2017 World Water Development Report (WWDR) on 'Wastewater: The untapped resource', highlighting the linkages between wastewater and industry
●     Understanding the urban-rural relationship in water reuse for irrigated agriculture
●     Emerging threats posed by pharmaceuticals wastes and pollutants in the aquatic environment
●     Water utilities’ role in managing wastewater
●     Release of an upcoming OECD report on policy solutions to diffuse pollution sources in wastewater

World Water Day is celebrated every year on March 22. It is a day to focus attention on the key importance of our planet's freshwater resources and to push for greater recognition of their sustainable management. Each year’s theme is proposed by UN-Water and is part of a broader campaign that highlights the complex role of water in our daily lives. World Water Day is a crucial opportunity to reflect and act.

This webinar is presented by the International Water Resources Association, and as each webinar, it features leading experts in the field, providing a synthesis of the critical facts and arguments needed to help the audience understand and discuss water policy.  It is designed to reach academics, dedicated practitioners, and policy professionals in a unique and informative way.

Recordings and presentations will be available at www.iwra.org and IWRA’s YouTube channel.

Participation
Participation is free and open to all. Audience questions are encouraged.

Register now! 
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/676815758663744770

Contact
Scott McKenzie: webinars@iwra.org

 

IWRA Webinar: The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD)

23 November 2016

With more than 90 attendees, the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) webinar on November 23rd was our strongest yet. This event brought together contributors from the special issue of Water International and others to discuss technical, legal, economic, and political problems and solutions for this major development. The speakers discussed how the GERD represents both a source of electricity for Ethiopia and a potential threat to Egypt's water security and has played a major factor in international relations between basin states. Even though this is a changed issue, our panelists agreed on the need for dialogue, openness, and the exchange of data.

Our event featured, Zeray Yihdego (University of Aberdeen), Salman Salman (Fellow, International Water Resources Association), Ana Cascao (Stockholm International Water Institute), Jasmine Moussa (PhD in Law, University of Cambridge), Kevin Wheeler (University of Oxford), Jasmine Moussa (PhD in Law, University of Cambridge), Marcella Nanni (Vice Chair, International Association for Water Law), Alistair Rieu-Clarke (Northumbria University), Kenneth Marc Strzepek (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and moderated by Scott McKenzie, (PhD Student University of British Columbia).

This webinar was based on special issue of Water International (Vol. 41 Issue. 4). This special issue was also the subject of an IWRA policy brief, available here.

Please download the presentations from both sessions below:

Session 1

- GERD: new norms of cooperation in the Nile Basin?
- The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam: A Catalyst for Change?
- Cooperative Feeling Approaches for the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam
- How has the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam changed the legal, political, economic and scientific dynamics in the Nile basin?

Session 2

- How has the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam changed the legal, political, economic and scientific dynamics in the Nile basin?
- The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam: A Catalyst for Change?
- The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam: A Catalyst for Cooperation on the Nile?
- Responding to the Crisis of the Filling of the GERD: An International Insurance Approach?
 

IWRA Webinar: Water Governance and Mining

11 October 2016

Mining represents untold wealth for people, communities, and nations around the world, but also plays a potentially dangerous and destructive role for water resources. This webinar panel focused its debate on the specific areas of inadequate hydrological, ecological and social research and the reluctance to truly empower local communities and non-governmental groups.

The webinar was moderated by, Scott McKenzie (University of British Columbia, Canada) and distinguished panelists; Prof. Anthony Turton (University of Free State of South Africa), Milgros Sosa Landeo (Wageningen University, The Netherlands), Prof. Guido Wyseure (KU Leuven, Belgium), Prof. Marie Claire Brisbois (University of Waterloo, Canada).

This webinar was based on special issue of Water International (Vol.41 Issue. 3). This special issue was also the subject of an IWRA policy brief, available here.

Please download the presentations below:

- Lessons from Yanacocha: assessing mining impacts on hydrological systems and water distribution in the Cajamarca region, Peru.
- Untying the Gordian Knot in the South African Goldfields
- Conflict resolution strategies in water disputes between communities and mining companies in Peru
- Collaborating With Power: Extractive Industry Involvement in Collaborative Water Governance in Canada

IWRA Webinar: Sustainability in the Water-Energy-Food Nexus

Session 1 - 24 February 2016
Session 2 - 25 February 2016

The Water-Energy-Food Nexus has increasingly been discussed by academics and policymakers who recognize the trade-offs and synergies that these major sectors provide. Addressing increased global demand while staying attuned to environmental challenges, the panelists engaged with a variety of research aimed at addressing questions of implementing this analysis at different scalar levels as well as how to best implement governance and management practices.

This webinar was organised by IWRA and the Sustainable Water Future Programme. The webinar was moderated by Scott McKenzie (PhD Student, University of British Columbia) and panelists included Rabi Mohtar (Texas A&M), Bassel Daher (Texas A&M), Jeri Sullivan Graham (Los Alamos National Laboratory), Dawit Mekonnen (International Food Policy Research Institute), Anik Bhaduri (Griffith University), Beatriz Mayor Rodríguez (Water Observatory Botin Foundation), Alisher Mirzabaev (University of Bonn), Maksud Bekchanov (International Water Management Institute).

This webinar was based on special issue of Water International (Vol.40 Issues. 5 & 6). This special issue was also the subject of an IWRA policy brief, available here.

Please download the presentations below:
- Sustainability in the Water Energy Food Nexus, introduction
- Sustainability in the Water Energy Food Nexus, WEF Nexus Research Group
- Water-Energy-Food (WEF) Nexus Tool 2.0, Daher
- Application of the WEF Nexus framework for the Duero river basin in Spain, Mayor
- Reuse of Oil and Gas Produced in Water in Southeast New Mexico-Resource Assessment, Treatment Processes and Policy, Sullivan Graham
- The Impact of water users associations on the productivity of irrigated agriculture in Pakistani Punjab, Mekonnen, Channa and Ringler
- Bioenergy, food security and poverty reduction: trade offs and sinergies along the WEF Security Nexus, Mirzabaev
- How would the Rogun Dam affect water and energy scarcity in Central Asia, Bekchanov
 

IWRA Webinar: Towards Equitable Water Governance 

7 May 2015
 

Many discussions have explored the relationship between water availability and poverty.  This webinar builds from these discussions to explore the relationship of water institutions to society, and the freedoms and capabilities that come from the equitable utilization of water.

The webinar panelists outlined steps to address the inequalities that come from traditional water governance. They discussed how politics and power create water inequities and how this pervades thinking about water and its allocation. The panel debated solutions including the co-production of public services and building coalitions with the low-income informal sector. Most critically, the panel introduced a broader idea of water equity that includes distribution, recognition, and participation by all stakeholders.

The webinar was moderated by Scott McKenzie (PhD Student, University of British Columbia Canada), and featured; Professor Ben Crow (University of California at Santa Cruz, USA), Mr. KJ Joy (Senior Fellow, Society for Promoting Participative Ecosystem Management, India); Professor Margreet Zwarteveen, (UNESCO-IHE and the University of Amsterdam, Netherlands); Dr. Veena Srinivasan (Fellow, Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment, India); Dr. Heather O’Leary, (Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Water Policy, McMaster University, Canada).

This webinar was based on special issue of Water International (Vol.39 Issue. 2). Please consult Water International online here.

Please download the presentations below:
- Water Progress and Poverty, Crow
- Towards Equitable Water Governance: processes and scales, Srinivasan
- Equity Re-allocations and Institutions, Joy
- Equitably Governing Globalizing Waters? Zwarteveen
 

IWRA Webinar: Land and Water Governance In Urban Regions

15 December 2014

A society that is expanding its use of land and water in urban areas needs to rethink the relation between planning and management. This webinar was devoted to rethinking the boundaries between land and water towards a more integrated governance approach.

The panelists outlined critical points in today’s governance debate. The unique framework discussed in this webinar identified three types of governance: vertical, horizontal, and fluid. The panellists applied these technical findings to broader questions about water quality and quantity - all of which defy political boundaries. The panelists argue that states must expand research and monitoring programs which compile, exchange and share technical data and information to promote and expand good governance. These steps transform water quality issues from a source of conflict to a tool that enhances state cooperation.

The webinar was moderated by Scott McKenzie (PhD Student, University of British Columbia Canada), and featured; Dr. Thomas Hartmann (Assistant Professor, Utrecht University, Netherlands); Dr. Barbara Warner (Scientific Referee, Academy for Spatial Research and Planning, Germany); Karen Hetz (PhD student, Humboldt University, Germany and University of the Witwatersrand South Africa); Meike Levin Keitel (PhD student, Leibniz University, Germany); and Barbara Temples (PhD student, Ghent University, Belgium).

This webinar was based on special issue of Water International (Vol.39 Issue. 6). This special issue was also the subject of an IWRA policy brief, available here.

Please download the presentations below:
- Frontiers of Land and Water Governance in Urban Regions, Thomas Hartmann
- A co-evolving frontier between land and water, Barbara Tempels, Thomas Hartmann
- Land and Water Governance: demands of a cross-border regional planning, Barbara Warner
- Managing Urban Riverscapes, Meike Levin-Keitel

IWRA Webinar: Why does the UN Watercourses Convention entry into force matter?

14 July 2014

After 17 years, the UN Watercourses Convention finally entered into force on August 17, 2014.

The webinar panel discussed the history and authority of the UN Watercourses Convention, as well as why it is an important supplement to existing treaty arrangements in many part of the world. They explored how entry into force brought added value to the normative values that the treaty embodies. Finally, the panel also discussed the complementarity between the UNECE Water Convention and the UN Watercourses Convention.

The webinar was moderated by Scott McKenzie (PhD Student, University of British Columbia Canada) and Tom Soo (Executive Director of the International Water Resources Association, France), and featured; Dr. Alistair Rieu-Clarke, (Reader in International Law, Centre for Water Law, Policy & Science, University of Dundee, Scotland), Mr. Remy Kinna, (Humanitarian Programme Manager, Oxfam Australia), Ms. Flavia Loures, (Independent Consultant), Dr. Owen McIntyre (Senior Lecturer, University College Cork, Ireland), Dr. Salman Salman, (Fellow, International Water Resources Association).

This webinar was based on special issue of Water International (Vol.38 Issue. 2). This special issue was also the subject of an IWRA policy brief, available here.

Please download the presentations below:
UNWC and Ecosystems protection, McIntyre, July 2014
Authority of UNWC, Rieu-Clarke, July 2014
UNWC Entry into force and Institutional coordination, Kinna, July 2014
Why does UNWC entry into force matter, Salman, July 2014
 

IWRA Webinar: Can Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene be a Preventive Medicine?

12 May 2014

IWRA successfully held it's first webinar on May 12th, 2014.  Expert panelists Dr Saravanan, Dr Gondhalekar, Ms. Bukirwa and Prof. Mollinga discussed how international, national and regional actors should consider the international goals (as evidenced through the MGD’s) as super-norms’ and should strive to contextualize these goals by playing ‘politics with principle’ to innovate the socio-technical and institutional dimensions for integrated water, sanitation and hygiene to reduce the threat from infectious diseases.
 

This webinar was based on the IWRA policy brief: "Can Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene be a Preventive Medicine?" This policy brief is available here

 

 

Please download the presentations below:
Can Water Supply and Sanitation be a Preventative Medecine?, Saravanan, 2014
Why Water supply and Sanitation Interventions Fail in LDCs(A case of Uganda), Bukirwa, 2014
Integrated water supply, sanitation & sewerage systems in urban planning for human health risk reduction, Gondhalekar, 2014
Comparative research for better Water Supply and Sanitation outcomes, Mollinga, 2014

2011 IWRA - International Water Resources Association office@iwra.org - http://www.iwra.org - Admin